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Every Star War’s fan’s thoughts on Disney owning Star Wars

I nearly choked on my drink from laughing.  This is gold.

Also, turning the Epcot ‘ball’ (which is actually called Spaceship Earth, FYI) into the Death Star is an epic idea.

How To Recolor Sprites in Gimp (A Very Simple Guide)

Ever wanted to change the color of a sprite character’s outfit, their eyes or  their hair? It’s very easy and simple to do using an art program (such as Gimp which is free) and even beginners can make nice color changes!  Follow along as I turn Elli’s dress from blue to pink:

1: Open up your sprite in Gimp and zoom in about 800%.  You want the sprite large enough that you can easily see the pixels.

2: Using the Select By Color Tool (it looks like a hand pointing to a bar colored blue, red and yellow and is generally in the top right hand corner of your toolbox) select the lightest color of the object you want to change.  It’s important to start with the lightest color as you can then easily darken the color bit by bit for the shading.

3: Using the Paintbucket tool, fill the selected areas in with the color of your choice.  You can quickly fill in all the areas by holding down Shift while selecting one of the highlighted areas – this will automatically fill them all.  While this is a great time saver, sometimes you will have to select each area individually if the color is used in other areas you want to leave as-is.

4: Using the Select by Color tool, select the next darkest area of the object you’re changing.  Then, using the color selector, pick a color that is darker than your original color.  Make sure it’s the equivalent darkness to the shade you are replacing – if it’s too light or too dark, it will look odd.

5: Repeat the process to fill in all the remaining shades until you have completely replaced the old color scheme with your new one.  The most important thing to remember is to match the shades that you’re replacing, otherwise the shape and shading will look off.

6: Zoom back to normal magnification and see how your sprite looks now.

7: There, she’s looking pretty good! Now I’m going to quickly repeat that whole process to change her bow to a more fitting color to match her dress:

8: Now let’s compare our original Elli next to her new version:

And there you have it! You can use this method to change any color on a sprite, but be aware that the more colors you are replacing, the more attention you have to pay to replacing the shades exactly.  Hair is one of the most difficult things to change because there is generally so many shades to replace and often the color of the hair is used elsewhere on the character, meaning you have to be careful exactly what you replace.  Elli has the same brown color of her hair outlining her face – changing her hair would be quite a project.  The easiest color to change is one that isn’t used elsewhere on the character – for example, Nami:

Her red hair is easy to change because the colors don’t blend into her face or outfit.  So it’s easy to make her, say, a blonde (with purple eyes, no less!):

Finally, remember to save your work often!  If you successfully change the color of a character’s shirt, save your work before you try to tackle another object.  That way if you mess up, you won’t have lost all your recoloring work.

Merry Geeky Christmas!

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Annnnnnd that’s my geeky Christmas contribution :) Just a Christmas tree ball I painted up a bit to make R2D2. Didn’t come out great though as I didn’t use the right type of paint.

That’s it for me until after Christmas. May you all have a nice holiday :)

Amigurumi Gameboy Color & Instructions

Way back in 2001 my siblings and I received our first hand held, the wonderful Nintendo Gameboy Color, which was probably used and abused more than it deserved by four eager children.  While our original gameboy is now long gone, I’ve tried my hand at making a cuddly, cutesy version of it, and here’s the end result! ^.^

You will need:

-cotton yarn (I used hot blue because it reminded me of the teal gameboy I used to have, but you can use any color you like)

-size G crochet hook

-yarn needle

-stuffing

-cardboard (I used an old box)

-black, dark gray and light gray felt

-embroidery floss in black, white, red, pink, purple, green, yellow and blue (I picked up a package of 36 skeins for $3.99 that had all the colors I needed)

-embroidery needle

-tacky glue

Crocheting the Gameboy

The gameboy is made of a front and back and one long strip for the sides. The front and back have a squared top and a slightly rounded bottom to replicate the Nintendo Gameboy Color’s shape.

Front & Back:

Row 1. CH 14, SC in first stitch from hook, SC x 13, turn

Row 2. SC x 14, turn

Rows 3 – 20. Repeat row 2

Row 21. Skip first stitch, SC x 12, turn

Row 22. Skip first stitch, SC x 10, slip stitch to next stitch, tie off

Repeat for back piece.

Side piece:

Row 1. CH 3, SC in first stitch from hook, SC 2, turn

Rows 2 – 68. SC x 3, turn

Tie off.

Assembling the Gameboy

1. Starting at one of the squared corners, sew the side piece all the way around either the front or back piece (seeing as they’re the exact same it doesn’t really matter). Sew the ends of the side piece together. You should now have something like a crocheted tray.  Place the second piece on top and sew it like you did the first, WITHOUT sewing closed the top side (the squared side). You need to leave this open so you can stuff the gameboy.  Make sure you’ve sewn both of the pieces with the rounded ends down.

2. Cut two pieces of cardboard roughly the size and shape of the gameboy front piece (see picture).  It doesn’t have to be exact, just enough of the right size and shape to fit inside the gameboy.

3. Slip the two pieces of cardboard inside the gameboy and stuff the stuffing in between, to make a sort of sandwich.  The cardboard gives the gameboy the proper shape and a flat front and back.  Once it’s stuffed to your liking, sew the opening closed and weave in the yarn ends.

Making the Face/Screen and Buttons

1. To make the back piece, cut a piece of black felt that is 3 ¼” x 2 /34”.  Round the corners and gently round the bottom just a bit (see pictures for example)

2. To make the screen, cut a piece of light gray felt that is 1 ¾” x 1 /12”.  Using black floss, stitch on a simple face.  Check out my face examples for ideas. Don’t worry about tying off the thread as you’ll be covering the back in glue next anyway.

3. Using plenty of glue, attach the screen to the back piece.  The felt will quickly adsorb the glue so use a lot! Make sure no threads are sticking out and that the screen is placed closer to the top of the back piece than the bottom (once again, use the example pictures for reference).

4. Using the dark gray felt, cut out two circles for the A and B buttons, the thumb pad and two small rectangles for the Select and Start buttons. Put these pieces aside for the moment.

ALTERNATIVE: You could also draw the face on the screen with a black sharpie or paint it on with acrylic paint, and use sewing/craft buttons for the A and B buttons.

Embroidering the Details

1.  With white floss, embroider GAMEBOY under the screen, making sure to leave enough room to add the rest of the name.  This can be pretty tricky and unless you are a world-class needle worker more likely than not your text may not be perfect, but it’s ok!  I suggest you cut the thread after you finish each letter to your liking.  That way, if you realize you’ve made a mistake on one letter you can carefully tear the thread out without having to undo all your other stitches.  Be careful not to pull or tear the felt while sewing. (picture 1)

2.  Starting with pink floss, start embroidering the COLOR part of the name, switching to purple for the O, green for the L, yellow for the second O and blue for the R.  Unlike the GAMEBOY part of the name, the COLOR is made to look more like scrawl so it’s okay if the letters are misshapen a bit – note that my R is sadly squashed as I was running out of room.  (picture 2)

3.  To make the power light and white arrows on the side of the screen, start with red floss and embroider a small square for the power light (you could also do a knot or other stitch, whatever you think looks best).  Using white floss, make three > in a row after the light.  (picture 3)

ALTERNATIVE: if the idea of all this embroidery is scary, you could either skip it all together (though it really does add to the project).  Or you could carefully paint on the details using acrylic paint.  A small red bead could also be used for the power light.

Finishing

1. Using plenty of glue, attach the face/screen to the gameboy (make sure the squared edge is right-side up and the rounded edge is the bottom!).  Make sure to spread plenty of glue over the back of the embroidery to keep the thread in place.  Press firmly onto the gameboy.

2.  Using the pictures for reference, glue the buttons, thumb pad and start/select buttons onto the gameboy’s lower half.  Once again, use a LOT of glue, the yarn and felt will absorb it quickly.

Congratulations, you’re done!

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